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passionate love affair while in cape town and they reached u.s. and egypt on september 3, 1942. i should probably give a little background on the war in africa. when historians talk about it can use metaphors like pendulum, it was this peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940. mussolini had visions of grandeur, he wanted to ride his streets down the roads of cairo and he decided to attack the british doing it. the british attacked back and drove the italians pretty far west into libya, at which point hitler realized that he really needed to bail out, although don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in or when ronald, along with a bunch of others and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolled around, things will quiet down and it was terribly hot. the campaigning with its glory would stop. they would advance then into libya in hopes of driving the forces back. ronald turned around and press the british back again. all the latest time, sort of disastrously, into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so when the american
that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again advanced by the british into libya in hopes of driving back the forces he turned around and pushed the british back again and all the way this time sort of disastrously all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so, when the american soldiers arrived, the allies i should say and the axis forces were dug in and testing each other in a place which was about 60 miles west of alexandria close enough to alexandria which was the british naval center in egypt close enough to cairo to be really extremely dangerous and i think frightening to all the allies on the suez canal or the middle eastern oil fields and just as they are now, there were critical to the british war effort so it was a tense moment and important and on september september 3rd they steamed up the red sea, unloaded and went off to the train
own passionate love affair in cape town, and then they reached suez in egypt on september 3rd, 1942. now i should probably give a little bit of background on the war in north africa. historian when they talk about it tend use metaphor like seesaw, pendulum, it was a peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940, moose lee knee had vision of grand door. he wanted to ride the white stallion down the street of cairo. he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east, the british attacked right back, and drove the italians pretty far west in to libya, at which point hitler realized he needed to power. i don't think he was happy about it. he sent inner win, the famous take commander along with a bunch of [inaudible] and he effectively drove the british back in to egypt. the campaigning would seize and the two sides would give inspect in the fall of 1941, there was advance by the british in to libya in hopes of driving the access forces back. rommel turned around and pushed the british back again, and all the way this time, sort of disastersously deep in t
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
. and then they reached suez in egypt on september 3rd, 1942. now, i should probably give a little background on the war in north africa. historians when they talk about it tend to use metaphors like seesaw, pendulum. it was this peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940. mussolini had visions of grandeur, i guess, wanted to ride his white stallion down the streets of cairo. he had trooped in libya when was an italian colony, and he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east. the british attacked right back and went, drove the italians pretty far west into libya at which point hitler realized he really needed to bail out his pal, mussolini, although i don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in irwin rommel, the famous tank commander, along with a bunch of perhapsers, and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolls around, things would kind of quiet down. it was terribly hot, and the campaigning would sort of cease, the two sides would dig in, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again an advance by the british into libya i
in alexandria, egypt where the british had a large fleet. and the two biggest but not quite finished battleships of the french fled to the car, west africa, and casablanca. but there was a very large flotilla on the algerian coast. there were a couple of battleships, some big cruisers, and the british came up with this idea. they called it operation catapult. on the morning of july 3, they were going to seize as many french ships as they possibly could buy agreement, hopefully, but if not, by force. and they figured, and portsmouth and plymouth, england, these ports are surrounded by british ships and british coastal batteries and that kind of thing. and in alexandria egypt kind of the same thing because there was a british port with the british origin big guns. there was only the french flotilla here, was a french naval base. and the british naval command, radioed of course in code to their fleet in gibraltar, and they said, this is what you have to do. you have to sail through the ninth of july 2 and 3rd, and show up at dawn. and give our terms to the fleet. and the terms were, or were going t
in england, plymouth, england, a lot were in alexandria, egypt, where the french -- or the british had a large fleet. and the two biggest but not quite finished battleships of the french fled to dakar, west africa, and cat blank ca -- cat blank ca. but there was a very large no tila on the algerian coast. there were a couple of battleships, some big cruisers. and the british came up with this idea, they called it operation catapult. on the morning of july 3rd, they were going to seize as many french ships as they possibly could by agreement, hopefully, but if not, by force. and they figured -- and portsmouth and plymouth, england. this was going to be fairly easy because these ports are surrounded by british ships and british coastal batteries and that kind of thing. and in alexandria, egypt, kind of the same thing because there was a british port with british forts and big guns and british fleet around. in algeria it was a different thing entirely because it was a french naval base, and the admiralcy, which is the british naval command, radioed, of course in code, to their fleet in gi
interest for america first? if you take a look at egypt, under the original plan, we gave tremendous amounts of foreign aid to the state of egypt. egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars that we are sending to egypt. we have to say that these dollars are for maintaining a security and peace and if you are not participating, you do not get these dollars. that is job one. we have to continue our commitment of foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally and our sister country come and we need to do everything we can fulfill our to fulfill our commitment. all of the foreign aid is spent right here in america un-american jobs. that is when the requirements. we need to gather up our allies and protect the people who serve in our state department we can secure them, they shouldn't be there. >> moderator: i'm going to go forward, but what you think should be the basic guiding principles, speaking a bit more probably? berg: if you are referring to dollars spent, or in general, our foreign policy, americ
and citizenship. peoples of egypt india algeria clearly did not fit the progressives view of the educated elite and by their definition they were close to quote life unworthy of life unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers found and even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies call it a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism, god, fair play and they avoided sensationalism and other things. american movie sold american exceptionalism, including quote puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally made fun of those values to the work of people such as buster keaton and charlie chaplin but this was all done tongue-in-cheek and never meant to totally undermined the system itself. by 1930, the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to frances 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply get.compete with hollywood and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wan
of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not forget the progressives' view of educated elites and by their definitions were close to, quote, unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american sensualism including, quote, puritanical mormonism, as one put it. they occasionally made fun of those values through the work of buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was never meant to totally undermine the system itself. by 1930 the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to france's 2400 and britain's 3,000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wanted to be like mik
about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progressive sea of educated elite and by their definitions were close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transit marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production codes that emphasize the universal american teens a teacher to some. god, fairplay and avoided sensationalism and other taboo faces. american movies sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally make fun of values to the work of equal such as keaton and charlie chaplin, but this is all done tongue-in-cheek and never was meant to undermine the system is self. by 1930, the u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europ
and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the presidency of educated elites and by their definition close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transfer marinade for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers come the film in the literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production emphasizes universal american team, sexualization, other top devices. american movie sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralist and as one observer put it. they occasionally need people such as keaton and charlie chaplin. is it is all done tongue-in-cheek to undermine the system itself. in 1832 u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis, 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and american exceptionalism from the europeans want to be like mike. inflation, communist, agitation, ethnic unrest in the slow contradictions of versailles and cause the postwar european structure to crumble into
to egypt with carter and sadat. i used to work for "the new york times." jim and i met in 1975, also, covering the bicentennial, election conquered. and we've been friends ever since throughout all the came pains, and i've seen sam over the campaigns. and jeanne livingston has been an associate for many years. >> what's this photograph? >> yes. that's the photograph that sort of symbolizes campaigning today and what the press has to go through. what we're seeing here is a rope line where the advance people for a certain candidate, in this case the dukakis people, try and control the press. that is, their movements, their acksess, where they're to go and not to go. and what had been happening in the dukakis campaign is we would land in an airport. there would be two advance people and there would be a clothe line, and they had like a mobile pin, instead of just a closed off pin, where the press would be able to go to. they got this wonderful idea of having a mobile pen. so you had two people, one with rope in each hand, running around making makeshift pens where the press could go. we
into the arab spring. in egypt last year, when they can shut down the internet, shutdown global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean they can do that? is a very important question. but let me focus on another important question that fewer people asked. how did egypt come to have an internet and the mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy a congressman of the clinton administration that most people, present company excluded, have never heard of. world trade organization agreement on basic telecommunications. back in the 1990s, monopolies operated communications networks in most countries around the world, generally government owned or controlled monopoly. that was the world most of us grew up in. it was before the internet and mobile communications took off, and it's not a coincidence that the end of that world coincided with a takeoff of mobile and internet. in any event, back then in the '90s, leaders at the white house, as stated above, commerce department, and yes the fcc, develop what many thought at the time wa
is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor
the librarian in alexandria, egypt, for instance. i hope i am not mangling his name to badly. roughly measure the world with not much more than, you know, a calendar and the sun and the big stick in the ground. and when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the natural world, that comes out of your curiosity, that is what i think i'm talking about when i talk about kids natural curiosity and how we have to keep telling the stories to fire up their imagination and creativity. >> host: zero contrarian tweet sent to you, these days history class is tend to focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. do we spend -- are we to eurocentric? to spend too much time on the magellan and columbus? >> tina, that's a good question. i think it has been somewhat addressed. some people think that it has swung too far. i know, for instance, there were some concerns a few years ago that there were history standards coming out that did not mention robert e. lee. on the other hand, there are the texas state textbooks which have been the subject -- subject of some co
people made these very extraordinary discoveries. i talk about the librarian in alexandria, egypt, eratosthenes. of i'm not mangling his name too badly who roughly measured the world without much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground. when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the national -- natural world that comes out your curiosity that is what i'm talking about what i talk about kids's natural security of a city and how we have to keep telling these stories to fire up their imagination and their creativity. >> guest: history classes focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. are we too for course been too much, and magellan and columbus and so on? >> that is a good question and it has been somewhat addressed, some people think that it has one too far. for instance there was some concern a few years ago that their history stand is coming that the dimension robert e. lee and on the other hand the texas textbooks have been a subject of controversy because they spend more time talking about jefferson davi
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)